FIVE Good Manga That Are Basically Porn

It’s December so I’m officially allowed to do whatever the fuck I want for Hump Day Doujin. This time, it’s not even doujin.

What’s that you say? I own the site so I can literally do whatever I want all the time? Touché, fat boy. And so I shall!

Maybe you can’t justify looking a lolifutas slamming giant, veiny cocks into your favorite mind-controlled waifu in public. I get it. But what about perfectly legitimate manga? No problem there, right? Well, I’m here to help. And to put some icing on this questionable cake, I’ll make sure the manga are even pretty good on top of that. These are all translated manga with loads of chapters, so I’ll just be giving super short, intentionally vague overviews to give you something to read over Christmas. What a great guy I am.

Nande Koko Ni Sensei Ga!?

Some moms do more than others.

Let’s do the two uncompleted series first, eh? Nande Koko ni Sensei Ga!? is just good fun. The basic premise is more or less a gag manga of a student and teacher ending up in sexual situations. Luckily, there’s a bit more depth of character and story progress than a lot of mangaka would have bothered with given the same setup. It started off as a few one-shot manga chapters that was likely to only be a single volume and then managed to get itself a proper serialization. While it has a bit of a tendency to ride its formula, it manages to keep the characters and archetypes fresh, something I wasn’t sure was going to be possible when the manga got a proper serialization, but Soborou managed to pull it out. The gags are fresh, the characters cover a good range of unique personalities, and the situations are fresh and fun without ever attempting to dip too deeply into more serious ideas. It’s a fun read where new chapters are always welcome, rather than tiresome or stressful.

Parallel Paradise

This is the least juicy scene in the manga.

I’ll be honest. I only semi-affectionately call Parallel Paradise “coochie mayonnaise.” This is maybe the one entry in the list where I vaguely hesitate to call it good outright. An isekai story where a guy ends up in a world with no men and the women have violently sexual reactions to his presence. Now, it’s literally undeniable that Okamoto Lynn is an industry monster, in a good way. He regularly produces well-received stories, most of which maintain an incredibly uncomfortable atmosphere underneath things that would be patently joyful in just about any other manga. Elfen Lied has a sort of legendary status among people who came up around the time of its production. It was shocking and strange and uncomfortable, hallmarks of Okamoto’s narrative style. The same for his notable works, specifically Gokukoku no Brynhildr. Another of his, Kimi wa Midara na Boku no Joou, is a bit less serious overall, but still dips into that melancholy and uncomfortable from time to time. Certainly he can’t escape his predilections and Parallel Paradise is no exception. An unique, uncomfortable, perverse isekai story that will keep you wondering exactly where it’s headed.

Nozoki Ana

Neighbors are such a pain.

My personal favorite from the list from easily one of my favorite mangaka in the modern era. Nozoki Ana handles character development in a way that’s casual, effective, and genuinely a joy to read. A guy moves in next door to a girl, but there’s a hole between the apartments. The girl suggests a schedule for peeping on each other. That’s how it starts. The story crosses from comical to flirty to serious and back over and over again without ever leaving the reader behind. It handles all the normal tropes of will-they-wont-they garbage like Suzuka without dragging out situations or failing to develop the characters. It’s a story that could have easily overstayed its welcome, but it never comes close. There is so much detail and subtle personality in every character in the book, even incidental ones. I could gush for pages, honestly, but I’ll leave it to you to go read. Honna Wakou, the mangaka, doesn’t have a twitter that I’m aware of. It’s sad, that, but life is hard sometimes. I fully recommend, NAY! Insist! I insist that you check out all four of her manga. They are each fantastic and enjoyable on multiple levels.

Mujaki no Rakuen

They’re playing “Find the Camembert.”

Did you lolicons think I was going to leave you out? Of course not. Why would I? Mujaki no Rakuen is far from a perfect product. It falls so hard into its own formula that there are times where you almost feel bothered working your way through some chapters. Still, there’s an interesting premise underlying the series, where a NEET is sent back in time and given a chance to relive his life over again, sort of. This leads to a lot of unintentionally perverse circumstances with the myriad girls in his class who all seem to be drawn to him for one reason or another. Sadly, the mangaka gets lost in the formula of his individual chapters and loses to the plot from time to time. Still, underlying it all is a story that’s genuinely interesting, with honest and emotional moments from time to time, while giving you plenty of loli perversion to enjoy. It was cancelled over loli crackdown concerns but quickly reappeared to get finished up as Mujaki no Rakuen Parallel where the story finished out properly. URAN‘s latest work, Skeeter Rabbit, is off to a promising start and looks like it’s going to explore some darker themes than Mujaki no Rakuen. I’m looking forward to it.

Uwakoi

She says that now…

Itosugi Masahiro is a mangaka I love, but I genuinely feel exhausted every time I finish one of her books. Her art is sublime, interesting, melancholic, and hard to look away from. She has a tone that is hard to deny as both compelling, terrifying, and generally unsettling. Uwakoi really exemplifies the drastic, soul-rending nature of most of Itosugi’s longer form works. There’s something incredibly impressive about her ability to draw you into the tone of the narrative and I think the visuals help a lot. Long forms, stark bodies, and an ability to draw dead-eyed youths that really makes you wonder if someone out there might finally understand you, deep inside. Interspersed in Uwakoi are moments of casual fun or levity that, in ways Okamoto Lynn never does, convince you to forget about what happened before and what’s bound to happen again. That false sense of security and Itosugi’s ability to lull you into it over and over are part of what makes her work so exhausting and so enjoyable at the same time. It’s definitely worth the pain because it hurts so good. She also did Aki Sora, but I couldn’t think of a good place to slide that in, unlike the protagonist of Uwakoi. *ominous eyebrow waggle*

Bonus Round!

Okay! Time to just spam links and do one sentence recommendations!

There’s a ton more out there, but we’ll save it for another time.

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